BabyHawk Mei Tai

This lovely reversible Mei Tai carrier has a pretty decorative panel on one side, but is plain on the other so it can be worn either way out.  It’s got comfortable straps that aren’t too wide or bulky, and that are nicely padded at the shoulder.  It has a lightly padded headrest area, which also helps to support the back of an older child if they prefer to have their arms out over the top of the carrier.  I found it very comfortable and supportive with my 16 month old, and it’s great in hot weather as you don’t have lots of fabric wrapped around you.

Here’s it out on a picnic in a back carry with arms in and then out.

BabyHawk Mei Tai to Hire  BabyHawk Mei Tai for Hire

And here on holiday with an 18 month toddler in a front carry:

Type of carrier: Mei Tai – fastens by securely tying the waist and shoulder straps around you to hold your baby or toddler close to your body. Find out more about Mei Tais here: About Asian Style Carriers.

Features: 100% cotton, reversible, padded shoulders and child head/back rest,

Suitable for: All parents and all children, depending on carry used.  At the Library the BAbyHawk is our favourite mei tai to borrow, and the shape seems to suit a very wide range of parents and babies. Thie one pictured is the standard sized BabyHawk, which may start to feel too small for larger toddlers by about 18-24 months (a larger sized ToddlerHawk is available). The standard length BabyHawk straps may not be long enough for all parents – some taller or larger parents may find that they need longer ‘XL’ straps, which are an additional option when ordering a BabyHawk.

Carrying positions: Primarily front and back, though can be used as a hip carrier too.

Ease of use: It does require a little practice, but most people get the hang of mei tais quickly. Compared to some carriers you get the reassurance of tying the waist straps first to help support your child securely while you tie the shoulder straps.  And like all mei tais it’s also easier than most other carrier options to do safe back carries. There are different tying options for each carrying position, but each are very quick and easy to do once you’ve got the knack, and it’s a lot easier than a woven wrap to work out how to get the tension and support right.

Comfort: Comfortable and supportive to wear as you can easily adapt the tying style to suit different shaped parents and babies. For heavier/bigger children you may find it starts to pull more at the shoulders, and that you’d prefer more padding or that you need a bigger size.

Overall Verdict: An attractive Mei Tai that’s easy to use, comfortable and practical.  Has all the basic features and padding you need without so much that it becomes bulky to wear or awkward to carry around. Definitely scores extra points for being reversible, and for being easier for Dads to learn to use too!

To hire this carrier from the South London Sling Library, email southlondonslings@hotmail.co.uk to check it’s availability and find out more!

This BabyHawk Mei Tai has been bought with help from The London Door Company.

 


© 2012 South London Sling Library
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About emeriminni

My name's Emily and I'm a pragmatic mum to 2 inspirational children, Sling Librarian, business owner/manager, part-time student & chronic craft enthusiast. I love reading, ranting, learning and making things & I'm interested in philosophy, psychology, babywearing & practical, natural-ish parenting, and all sorts of creative things (esp. crochet, dyeing, sewing, beading and baking).
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